I Can See The Future

The deepest secrets of the Eye and its beholder

A Hard Rain’s A-Gonna Fall

Oh, where have you been, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, where have you been, my darling young one?
I’ve stumbled on the side of twelve misty mountains,
I’ve walked and I’ve crawled on six crooked highways,
I’ve stepped in the middle of seven sad forests,
I’ve been out in front of a dozen dead oceans,
I’ve been ten thousand miles in the mouth of a graveyard,
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, and it’s a hard,
And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Oh, what did you see, my blue-eyed son?
Oh, what did you see, my darling young one?
I saw a newborn baby with wild wolves all around it
I saw a highway of diamonds with nobody on it,
I saw a black branch with blood that kept drippin’,
I saw a room full of men with their hammers a-bleedin’,
I saw a white ladder all covered with water,
I saw ten thousand talkers whose tongues were all broken,
I saw guns and sharp swords in the hands of young children,
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard,
And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

And what did you hear, my blue-eyed son?
And what did you hear, my darling young one?
I heard the sound of a thunder, it roared out a warnin’,
Heard the roar of a wave that could drown the whole world,
Heard one hundred drummers whose hands were a-blazin’,
Heard ten thousand whisperin’ and nobody listenin’,
Heard one person starve, I heard many people laughin’,
Heard the song of a poet who died in the gutter,
Heard the sound of a clown who cried in the alley,
And it’s a hard, and it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard,
And it’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Oh, who did you meet, my blue-eyed son?
Who did you meet, my darling young one?
I met a young child beside a dead pony,
I met a white man who walked a black dog,
I met a young woman whose body was burning,
I met a young girl, she gave me a rainbow,
I met one man who was wounded in love,
I met another man who was wounded with hatred,
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard,
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Oh, what’ll you do now, my blue-eyed son?
And, what’ll you do now, my darling young one?
I’m a-goin’ back out ‘fore the rain starts a-fallin’,
I’ll walk to the depths of the deepest dark forest,
Where the people are many and their hands are all empty,
Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters,
Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison,
Where the executioner’s face is always well hidden,
Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten,
Where black is the color, where none is the number,
And I’ll tell it and speak it and think it and breathe it,
And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it,
Then I’ll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin’,
But I’ll know my song well before I start singin’,
And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard,
It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Artist-Bob Dylan

Album-The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan(1962)

Composed,Sung And Written By-Bob Dylan

As any music lover will tell you if there was only one word to describe Dylan’s songs it would be poetic, he had the ability to describe even the most lagging and hallucinating narratives in a simple offhand manner. But this song is not merely poetic, it is melodic,prophetic and above all timeless. Its lyric structure is based on the question and answer form of the traditional ballad ‘Lord Randall’, Child ballad no.12. A father asking his son questions about what he saw on his journey, who did he meet,where did he go to etc and in the answers the son describes the whole world in an innocent but hard hitting manner. Dylan was popularly known as a prophet in the 60’s and songs like this shows why ,in this song he describes things which were true then,which are true now and which will remain true in coming time. He talks about racism,natural calamities,people living in fear,oppressed people, he defines a true leader and he predicts, he predicts like a man standing on mountain shouting for the deaf world, warning about a self induced Apocalypse.

July 15, 2008 Posted by | Music Review, Tuesday's Blues | 2 Comments

Ye Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai

“Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai”

Yeh Mehlon,Yeh Takhton,Yeh Taajon Ki Duniya,
Yeh Insaan Key Dushman Samaajon Ki Duniya,
Yeh Doulat Key Bhookhey Riwajon Ki Duniya,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai.

Har Ek Jism Ghayal, Har Ek Rooh Pyaasi,
Nigahon Mein Uljhan, Dilon Mein Udaasi,
Yeh Duniya Hai Ya Aalam-e-Badhawasi,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai.

Yahaan Eik Khilona Hai Insaan Ki Hasti,
Yeh Basti Hai Murda Paraston Ki Basti,
Yahaan To Jeevan Sey Hai Maut Sasti,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai.

Jawaani Bhatakti Hai Badkaar Ban Kar,
Jawaan Jism Sajtey Hein Bazaar Ban Kar,
Yahaan Pyaar Hota Hai Byopaar Ban Kar,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai.

Yeh Duniya Jahaan Aadmi Kuch Nahi Hai,
Wafa Kuch Nahi, Dosti Kuch Nahi Hai,
Yahaan Pyaar Ki Qadr Hi Kuch Nahi Hai,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai.

Jala Do Isey, Phoonk Dalo Yeh Duniya.
Mere Saamne Se Hata Lo Yeh Duniya,
Tumhari Hai Tum Hi Sambhalo Yeh Duniya,
Yeh Duniya Agar Mil Bhi Jaye To Kya Hai?

Movie-Pyaasa(1957)

Music-Sachin Dev Burman

Lyrics-Saahir Ludhiyanavi

Singer-Mohhamad Rafi

Guru Dutt always saw songs as an ongoing sequence which can be best described by the poetry. Usually Saahir Ludhiyanvi provided that poetry. Saahir always saved his best for Guru Dutt’s movies . In the movie the song was visualised as the ultimate achivement of the all time loser, the ragged Poet,the drunkard shunned by society,left by girlfriend,despised by his clan suddenly gets everything he ever strived for. This was the moment when he looks down at all the people he had ever known and sees only one face which didn’t have Greed and really loved him, ‘the Prostitute’ and then he curses the Society in his own poetic manner as S.D Burman’s tunes pierce your heart and you experience the same pain as ‘Vijay’ and you spill you heart out in the immortal voice Of Mohammad Rafi and leave all the artificial things which consumed you.

July 8, 2008 Posted by | Music Review, Tuesday's Blues | 5 Comments